Waxoil.....

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Terry Brooks
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Post by Terry Brooks » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:14 pm

DavidRutherford wrote:
Terry Brooks wrote:...live dangerously by heating it up on camping stove...
:shock: :shock:

Waxoyl has a flash-point temperature of only 75degC.

And burns very well indeed. Don't ask me how I know that.
Yeah ....I noticed that too :oops: :shock: :roll:
But at least I did'nt get it all over the cat :lol: :lol: :lol: [Brilliant story David] ;)
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Post by Way2go » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:23 pm

These replies have given me an understanding of what is involved.........Thanks for the info & the humour. 8) :D
Appreciate the amazing in-depth pictures and what to look for from rob-bx16v and I guess he confirms what Stewart said in the first reply that waxoyling is an institution rather than a product. :wink:

I have noticed a very small rust penetration on a rear door shut which Rob said is connected to a seam splitting over time so I suppose this means I need to get dirty on this :!: :cry:
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Oscar
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Post by Oscar » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:26 pm

Yes Rob very good work and very informative. Thanks for taking the time to post. I have 5 lt of Waxoyl in my cellar - now I know what is involved.....

O
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Post by jeremy » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:40 pm

I think the back seam is a little more important than it looks especially on a 16 valve or GTi.

One of the tricks of getting a car to handle well is to get each component to do what it's designed to do and not the job of other components. What I mean by this is that the suspension should do the suspending and the bodyshell should supposrt the suspension. However car bodies have a tendancy to join in with the suspension and are designed to be rigid to prevent this.

One of the problems with hatchback and estate car bodies is the difficulty of making the large hole in the back without loosing all the boddy strength. In times gone by things like Mk 11 cortinas and Hillman Hunters has back panels and a top opening boot so that a metal panel could be used there to provide rigidity. Often a couple of metal bars were used diagonally behind the back seat for this purpose as well.

You can't have a bars in a hatchback and so the structure has to be designed to manage without them and this is I'm sure why the BX hatch has the lip below the hatch. It follows that the structure at this point is also probably highly stressed and such stressing tends to promote flexing which in turn aggravates corrosion.

On my 16 valve (which has only done 58,000 miles) the corrosion in this area was quite bad and when I tackled it I found that the body was coming off the 'chassis' underneath. Nothing particularily difficult but to get the car going at its best this should be repaired carefully and attention paid to getting all the little bits of structure back where they should be, rather than just filling the holes.

Incidentally I think some of the bumper bolts should be sealed when fitted (blob of mastic or rubber washer) as I seem to recall that they could encourage water to get under the bumper and cause corrosion.

jeremy

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rob-bx16v
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Post by rob-bx16v » Tue Mar 14, 2006 5:58 pm

8) rear door shut on a 16v model. note-not my car! thank god


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Post by Cornishbx16v » Tue Mar 14, 2006 7:27 pm

love that story from the landy forum! thats brilliant!
I had the added advantage as i mentioned earlier of an two poster ramp and a very expensive Power washer! we also had a Very large compresser that powered the attatched workshop to power the airlines!! so i used to be able to have a car from a dry clean underside to dripping in waxoil in 45minutes! It certainly isnt a clean thing to do with an airline! although i did used to go out prepared with boiler suit, dispo gloves, beanie hat, gogles and darthvader style breathing mask and i still had black bogies!!! hahaha!

I have to say though, i did my 16v one morning, steamed off the bottom and left to dry, then covered the car in it! and have never found any of it to have fallen off! and when i applied a thicker coat when i had the car up on stands the bottom was all nice and clean and black!
well worth doing but you do need to get the prep right!
Timmo.

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Post by Stewart (oily!) » Tue Mar 14, 2006 11:32 pm

Fail to prepare, prepare to fail thats the byword in the coatings game
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Post by sleepy0905 » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:05 am

Its true ive beencovered from head to toe in the bloody stuff when i Did my metro many years ago It can get in places you dont even want to think about.
Very good pictures rob nice to see where thay are prone to rot i shall be checking some of them areas as some of them have already been done.
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cavmad
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Post by cavmad » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:45 am

Is waxoil similar to underseal? I only ask because I`d been warned off by a few people who reckon that when applied to the underside of the car stones flying up chip away at it and water gets in. Eventually the car rots from the inside out as the water gets trapped. Apologies of I`m barking up the wrong tree and Waxoil and underseal are different things altogether.
Personally speaking I`d be tempted to thoroughly blast the area off where possible and get it down to bare metal then paint or spray with red oxide primer then a good few coats of paint or waxoil.
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Post by sleepy0905 » Wed Mar 15, 2006 10:16 am

Waxoil is clear and is designed to go in box sections where Underseal is black bitumen with waxoil added. Now underseal if applied correctly will last for quite a few years and will always be flexible but it does dry out eventually it is also designed to absord stone chips I will be doing the underseal on mine this year and putting waxoil in the box sections There is also a product called stone chip which you can put on before underseal and it does exactly what it is called and absorbs stone chips with no damage its grey in colour can be painted over and is mainly designed for the in the wheel arches and the sills but can be used anywhere.
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Post by Terry Brooks » Wed Mar 15, 2006 10:24 am

cavmad wrote:Is waxoil similar to underseal?
Nahh ....it's "runnier" and smells like deisel? or turps? ....and as the name implies it seems ....errr "waxy" and "oily".....the advertising blurb claims it never fully sets and any stone chips "heal" themselves ....I take that with a pinch of salt but it is [IMHO] good stuff ....
I also find it useful for coating the electrics on my "Off Road"/"Greenlaner" motorbikes,I paint plenty of it over the ignition lead and coil it keeps the water out really well when you're "off roading" in wet/muddy conditions.
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Post by jeremy » Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:15 am

Waxoyl can be handy for applying over existing sealers that are looking a bit tired - like under the floor - as it will soak in and fill in the cracks - and may even get behind if they are lifting. Ok - not as good as total removal, cleaning, priming and re-coating - but much more likely to get done.

It seems to have good resistance to blast but I wouldn't use it on its own in the direct line of the wheels. I feel a form of underseal is best there - and Black Waxoyl seemed to work well on our Mini wheel arch.


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Post by Mike P » Wed Mar 15, 2006 12:18 pm

Rob,

Your using pictures of my new white Phase 1 to highlight areas of rust even before I've been to collect it tonight :!: :lol:

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Post by DavidRutherford » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:31 pm

The other great thing about waxoyl is that it "creeps" like diesel fuel, up to about 2". This means that you don't necessarily have to spray it on ever single square inch of metalwork to protect it. Put a blob on some bare metalwork and it will protect an area the size of a drinks coaster.

I sprayed the leaf springs of my landrover as I was fed up of them squeaking, only to discover that 2 days later it had "crept" all over them, round the bolts, and (unfortunately) over the bushes too. It really does get everywhere.
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Post by Stewart (oily!) » Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:50 pm

Back in the seventies we used to make lots of dosh smearing underseal around under wheelarches, and often used to find a smooth film of underseal covering rotten metal, it tended to be too brittle I think, it would crack and then water could get behind it and make the situation worse than if the seal had not been applied, waxoly will wash off wheelarches but generally seems to hang in there and do its job, especially in box sections, I have the very beginnings of the rear door shut problem which I will treat with some 97% zinc paint I have, I also paint the inner wings etc with it.
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