Replacing the flexible steering coupling

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adamskibx
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Replacing the flexible steering coupling

Post by adamskibx » Fri Sep 22, 2006 7:51 pm

I did this job overnight in order to get to Scotland safely the next day (I shared the driving with a mate and woke up somewhere just north of Manchester on the M6 :D ). For something that is supposedly an easy job, I found it perhaps more difficult than changing a clutch. It was so awkward. I started off undoing the bolts and holding the allen key side still with an allen key, and found the easiest way to get it going was to hold the wheel on the steering lock to undo the bolt. Then I came to do the other bolt, but of course the wheel had to be in a different position to the steering lock, so I held the wheel in place by wedging a hammer between the central spoke and the dash. When it occured to me that you can get great access to the top bolts through the footwell, I thought great, putting the new disk on wont be as hard. Having said that, I had to grip the allen key side of the bolts using an allen key, monky-wrenched to something under the car, in order to keep that still as I did up the bolts from inside the car etc. Also, I don't know whether this is normal, but the new disks just come as a disk, with no rivetted in bolts or splined attatchment for the rack. I had to get the bolts from a local tractor spares shop (locktighted type as recomended by local BX specialist). I also had to hammer out the rivetted splined grip for the rack, bolt it onto the new disk, then cut off the excess bolt length.

I was shoked at the state of the old disk. It was split right from the edge to the center in two places (each side of where a bolt went through). Even by hand, you could turn the steering wheel end and watch the rack end stay still after I had taken it off. It was so so dangerous. Luckily, it has cured the directional instability of the car, and the steering wheel feels very in touch with the road surface now.

Id recomend that anyone who feels a bit of play in the steering of their BX to check this disk.

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Way2go
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Re: Replacing the flexible steering coupling

Post by Way2go » Sat Sep 23, 2006 2:21 pm

adamskibx wrote:Also, I don't know whether this is normal, but the new disks just come as a disk, with no rivetted in bolts or splined attatchment for the rack. I had to get the bolts from a local tractor spares shop (locktighted type as recomended by local BX specialist). I also had to hammer out the rivetted splined grip for the rack, bolt it onto the new disk, then cut off the excess bolt length.
If you buy from GSF then they just do the rubber disk BUT if you buy from Citroen dealer, you get the whole assembly with the metal bits rivetted on which fits straight away. Cost was £17.14 + vat. :D :D
1991 BX19GTi Auto

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Way2go
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Post by Way2go » Sat Sep 23, 2006 2:33 pm

It also occurred to me after replacement of this disc that failure can be induced by driver actions because you are not aware of the fragility of the component.

For instance before replacement, I often did a final small straightening of the cars wheels on my drive after stopping the engine. This must have placed enormous stress on the disc so needless to say I now only turn the steering wheel with the engine running. :oops:
1991 BX19GTi Auto

adamskibx
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Post by adamskibx » Sat Sep 23, 2006 2:54 pm

Oh right I see. I should have got the original Citroen component then really. The fact that the bolts took up so much more room than rivets also meant that it was extremely difficult to get the bolt that grips the steering rack pinion through. It wouldnt go through one way due to the orientation of the one nut, so I had to put it through the other way where the nuts flat side was in line with the bolt; even then I had to hammer it through, then, with great difficulty tighten the nut.

I know what you mean about the stresses that must be put on the disk too. I have a feeling I know what did it. When I accidentally drove off with the suspension on low and hit a bump, I reckon the shock went through the steering as it had nowhere else to go. This seemed to be when the steering went dodgy. The steering is now very secure feeling.