Boot cubby hole door - Trim clips

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Vanny
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Boot cubby hole door - Trim clips

Post by Vanny »

After releasing the Ender5 3D printer article last month, a few people have contacted me about making parts.
The first one I'm tackling is the BX boot door trim clip, requested by Mike E of this parish.
It seems these trim clips have a tendency to snap, so the design has been improved a bit.

read more here

Image

https://bxproject.co.uk/blog/citroen-bx ... trim-clip/

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deltic
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Re: Boot cubby hole door - Trim clips

Post by deltic »

Great stuff! One part that I think would be useful would be the spat (if that's the correct term) on the leading edge of the rear wings. I need both but only have a spare for the nearside.

I'd imagine getting them off will be a pain...
1991 BX GTi auto, grey, 137,000 miles (2015, 2017 & 2019 Citroen Classic Challenge veteran)
1991 BX GTi auto, grey, 85,000 miles
2006 C4 VTR+ 2.0 Coupé, silver, 73,000 miles

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white exec
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Re: Boot cubby hole door - Trim clips

Post by white exec »

Vanny,
How large an item are you able to print?
Are you doing your own 3D scanning, or having it done?
I ask, because there are a couple plastic parts for XM that would be nice to do...

One more BX part could be the pair of front-corner 'hooks' for the rear parcel shelf.
Chris

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Vanny
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Re: Boot cubby hole door - Trim clips

Post by Vanny »

At the moment, 220 x 220 is the max, but this can make the parts brittle if they are directly copied. For something like the side spat, they would need a little redesign to be more rigid. At which point it can be quicker to just recast them in an epoxy resin.

In terms of scanning, I've tried a few different photogrametry methods, and always find I'm faster just designing the thing in CAD. I'm a long way of being a CAD engineer, but understanding how the original part was made/injected/cast does make redesigning for a printer much quicker.

A proper scanning system is £6k at the cheap end, £20k at the steep end, but you can pretty much create a business from a tool. The issue with scanning is it usually gives you a surface or mech, but not a CAD drawing. The cloud data from a scanner is usually an utter mess and needs hours of cleaning.

As for the hooks on the parcel shelf, I remade mine in steel and some 2mm galve plate. That won't fail in a hurry!